Wild Darlings Sing the Blues and It's a Song of Freedom

a radical movie about healing, using filmmaking as movement meditation.

Wild Darlings is an Afro-surrealist documentary about a group of queer women and non-binary people of color building a healing sanctuary for one week in the woods of Pennsylvania (August 15-21, 2018).

Engaging in various types of somatic and spiritual healing work, we will create a safe space to process grief and pain rooted in our experiences of racism, rape, colorism, and other political diseases linked to patriarchy and colonialism. The community, under the guidance of an elder and other facilitators, will support one another in releasing this pain into creative energy, using creativity to transmute the pain.


Much like Ntozake Shange’s seminal work for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow was enuf – wild darlings utilizes choreopoems as a technology for storytelling that centralizes and values black and queer bodies and stories.

Using filmmaking as a movement meditation (on grief, on madness, dominance, on submission, on liberation, on community, on love), we will be filming one another in the process. At the same time, we will be creating video art pieces inspired by the stories, emotions and memories that surface throughout the healing work. These pieces will be filmed by a small all women-of-color crew. 

We’re building this journey as a self-made rite of passage – to confront our traumas as individuals as well as the social traumas of our ancestors and of our collective consciousness, in a way that honors our bodies, the earth, and our spiritual growth and expansion.

Learn more and contribute at Women's Voices Now. 


My Third Eye

This silent meditation on the relationship between a little girl and the male family member sexually abusing her examines the pain of intergenerational black familial trauma, but also the gift of spiritual independence. 

Screen Shot 2018-07-07 at 12.47.00 AM.png

Handmade in Thamaja 

This silent meditation on the relationship between a little girl and the male family member sexually abusing her examines the pain of intergenerational black familial trauma, but also the gift of spiritual independence. 

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 9.16.38 PM.png